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Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of NPR's Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, with Rachel Martin and David Greene.

Known for probing questions to everyone from presidents to warlords to musicians, Inskeep has a passion for stories of the less famous—like an American soldier who lost both feet in Afghanistan, or an Ethiopian woman's extraordinary journey to the United States.

Since joining Morning Edition in 2004, Inskeep has hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, Cairo, Houston and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," on conflict in Nigeria. In 2012 he traveled 2,700 miles across North Africa in the wake of the Arab Spring. In 2013 he reported from war-torn Syria, and on Iran's historic election. In 2014 he drove with colleagues 2,428 miles along the entire U.S.-Mexico border; the resulting radio series, "Borderland," won widespread attention, as did the acclaimed NPR online magazine of the same name.

Inskeep says Morning Edition works to "slow down the news," making sense of fast-moving events. A prime example came during the 2008 Presidential campaign, when Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris conducted "The York Project," groundbreaking conversations about race, which received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for excellence.

Inskeep was hired by NPR in 1996. His first full-time assignment was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush. After the September 11, 2001, attacks, he covered the war in Afghanistan, turmoil in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid gone wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of NPR News teams awarded the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for coverage of Iraq.

On days of bad news, Inskeep is inspired by the Langston Hughes book, Laughing to Keep From Crying. Of hosting Morning Edition during the 2008 financial crisis and Great Recession, he told Nuvo magazine when "the whole world seemed to be falling apart, it was especially important for me ... to be amused, even if I had to be cynically amused, about the things that were going wrong. Laughter is a sign that you're not defeated."

Inskeep is the author of Instant City: Life and Death in Karachi, a 2011 book on one of the world's great megacities. He is also author of Jacksonland, a forthcoming history of President Andrew Jackson's long-running conflict with John Ross, a Cherokee chief who resisted the removal of Indians from the eastern United States in the 1830's.

He has been a guest on numerous TV programs including ABC's This Week, NBC's Meet the Press, MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN's Inside Politics and the PBS Newshour. He has written for publications including The New York Times, Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This week, we're asking what it really means to live in a world with 7 billion people. For some answers, we visit Karachi, Pakistan.

The grandest expression of the world's population growth is in the word "megacity." Dozens of these cities of more than 10 million now ring the globe, like a string of oversized pearls. In a megacity, people and ideas clash: The ancient collides with the modern; secular with religious; global with local. In Karachi, Pakistan, those forces can be seen in the story of a single piece of real estate.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Netflix trying to change back.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's talk about the two Americans who have won the 2011 Nobel Prize for economics. They are Princeton's Christopher Sims and Thomas Sargent of New York University. We're going to talk about them with NPR's Jim Zarroli. Jim, good morning.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene in for Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Sylvia Poggioli is on the line from Athens with more. Hi, Sylvia.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI: Hi there, Steve.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

President Obama left behind the debate in Washington yesterday to campaign for his jobs bill, which includes money to upgrade infrastructure. He visited the Brent Spence Bridge in Cincinnati, which is considered obsolete. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Renee Montagne is in Afghanistan. Im Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, host:

And Im David Greene.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

Over the weekend, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro packed up her microphone and left Libya. She's taking a short break after months of covering the conflict.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Some people had to get up early on this Labor Day. And if you're one of them, we're glad you're letting us join you, and thanks for doing what you do. But, of course, many people will return to work or school tomorrow.

Asian Markets Tumble

Sep 5, 2011

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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

NPR's business news starts with Asian markets down.

(Soundbite of music)

INSKEEP: Stock exchanges across Asia dropped sharply today after Friday's dismal U.S. jobs report. The report showed no new jobs were added in August.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Im Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning Im David Greene. Renee Montagne is on assignment in Afghanistan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And Im Steve Inskeep.

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Hi, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: When we say fell, how bad was it?

In Libya, one of the most senior rebel commanders has been killed. Abdel-Fattah Younis did not die in battle against the forces of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi; apparently he was killed by someone on his own side.

The circumstances surrounding Younis' death are still unclear. But there are fears that his murder will deepen internal divisions in the rebel military leadership.

Steve Inskeep speaks with Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in the rebel stronghold of Benghazi, Libya.

Inskeep: What happened?

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