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In men's singles tennis, no athlete has ever won a "golden slam" – meaning winning all four major tournaments and an Olympic gold medal in a single year.

Serbia's Novak Djokovic is trying to change that. If he takes gold at the Tokyo Olympics, he'll only need to win one more major tournament – the U.S. Open – to complete the historic feat.

The youngest Olympian at the Tokyo Games was knocked out of the competition in her first round on Saturday.

The Syrian table tennis player, Hend Zaza, just twelve years old took it all in stride. She snapped a picture with her Austrian opponent, Liu Jia before leaving.

In her Olympic debut, Zaza played a woman more than three times her age at the women's singles preliminary round. She's beat players more seasoned than herself before. To qualify for the Games she bested a 42-year-old Lebanese player when she was eleven.

The new chief of the U.S. Capitol Police on Friday defended the beleaguered agency, saying that the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection should not define the department and that necessary changes to its procedures have been made in the months since.

"I know how good this U.S. Capitol Police Department is. I know the kind of work that these men and women have done over the years," Tom Manger, who has four decades of experience in law enforcement and who started in his new role on Friday, said in an interview with NPR.

Protests by athletes have become common and more widely embraced in the last few years, and the Olympics has updated its rules to allow for it – within limits.

Samoa will be led by a female prime minister for the first time in its history after an appeals court ruling ended a months-long constitutional crisis in the Pacific island nation.

The search for victims in one of the deadliest building collapses in U.S. history has come to an end after four weeks. Firefighter crews have scoured the debris left on the site of the catastrophe without finding evidence of additional casualties.

Miami-Dade Police Detective Lee Cowart confirmed that fire department search crews have vacated the site.

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U.S. Capitol Police are facing intense criticism after officers were overrun by rioters in the deadly January 6 attack. The agency is now at one of its most challenging moments in its history, facing low officer morale, growing resignations and simply running out of money. Now, they have a new leader vowing to revamp the department. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Grisales talked to the new chief on his first day on the job.

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U.S. Capitol Police are facing intense criticism after officers were overrun by rioters in the deadly January 6 attack. The agency is now at one of its most challenging moments in its history, facing low officer morale, growing resignations and simply running out of money. Now, they have a new leader vowing to revamp the department. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Grisales talked to the new chief on his first day on the job.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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You've probably heard of the five stages of grief. I mean, they're pretty firmly lodged into American pop culture. There's...

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U.S. Capitol Police are facing intense criticism after officers were overrun by rioters in the deadly January 6 attack. The agency is now at one of its most challenging moments in its history, facing low officer morale, growing resignations and simply running out of money. Now, they have a new leader vowing to revamp the department. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Grisales talked to the new chief on his first day on the job.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

U.S. Capitol Police are facing intense criticism after officers were overrun by rioters in the deadly January 6 attack. The agency is now at one of its most challenging moments in its history, facing low officer morale, growing resignations and simply running out of money. Now, they have a new leader vowing to revamp the department. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Grisales talked to the new chief on his first day on the job.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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All right, today brought the long-delayed opening ceremony of the Olympic Games in Tokyo - dazzling affair, but without the big in-person audience. NPR's Leila Fadel was among the few hundred inside the stadium.

Hey, Leila.

The winding streets of old Istanbul are an overlapping cacophony of seagulls, ship horns and vendors of colorful fresh fruit. Shady fig trees cluster near crumbling Byzantine walls and sweeping Ottoman palaces, remnants of the empires that conquered and lost this strategic point on the Bosporus Strait, which formed the seat of the Eastern Roman Empire.

Underneath it all is an ancient world that's almost invisible, unless you know where to look.

OSHA has announced 59 citations and nearly $1 million in penalties after an investigation into a nitrogen leak at a poultry processing plant that killed six workers and injured at least a dozen others earlier this year.

Pictogram people become unlikely MVPs

One of the most striking sequences in the Tokyo Olympics' opening ceremony revolved around pictograms. Tokyo organizers have been touting their "kinetic pictograms," which show figures bursting into motion across dozens of disciplines. For Friday's ceremony, they brought all 50 of those pictograms to life.

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This is FRESH AIR. I'm David Bianculli, professor of television studies at Rowan University, sitting in for Terry Gross. Our guest, actor Hugh Grant, has been nominated for an Emmy for his role in the HBO miniseries "The Undoing." He became famous for his romantic comedies and for playing witty and charming characters. His breakthrough role was in the 1994 movie "Four Weddings And A Funeral." He also starred in "Bridget Jones's Diary," "About A Boy," "Love Actually," "Music And Lyrics" and "Florence Foster Jenkins."

Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Copyright 2021 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

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Bob Sinner, a specialty soybean producer in North Dakota, has a major problem on his hands: He has plenty of beans, but he's struggling to ship them to his customers overseas, and his deliveries are running at least a month and a half behind schedule.

"We've had customers in Asia that have had to stop their operations waiting for supply," Sinner says. "Our farmers need to get their storage facilities emptied because we have a new crop that's coming in September, October. We have to get this product moving."

The battle is now joined at the U.S. Supreme Court. This week the state of Mississippi formally asked the high court to reverse its landmark 1973 abortion decision, Roe v. Wade, prompting abortion-rights defenders to say, in effect, "I told you so."

While flying between the Alaskan cities of Kotzebue and Nome, a Coast Guard helicopter crew spotted an SOS sign on top of a shack. Circling back over the remote mining camp, they found a man waving his hands in the air.

Friends had reported him missing after he hadn't returned to his Nome home. It turned out the man had been mauled by a bear days earlier, the crew realized when they finally got to him last week. That attack bruised his torso and injured his leg, according to the Coast Guard.

Many companies own other companies, brands or things that you may not expect. Shalewa Sharpe and Gastor Almonte, hosts of the podcast The War Report, figure out which corporate relationships are true and which are false. Pet food candies? Cheesecake workouts? These days, who's to say.

Heard on MathNuggets.

Ask Me Another's staff recently learned that, back at the New York office, there is an ever-growing pile of listener mail from film-buff surgeons. Thus, hosts of the podcast The War Report, Shalewa Sharpe and Gastor Almonte, play this word game in which every answer is the title of a movie, with one of the words replaced with a rhyming body part.

If there are two things that exude the same type of power in this world, it's Motown powerhouses and deluxe menu items from Taco Bell. That's why in this music parody game, The War Report podcast hosts Shalewa Sharpe and Gastor Almonte are served a hefty helping of Supremes songs rewritten to be about fast food chains.

Heard on MathNuggets.

Updated July 23, 2021 at 6:53 PM ET

Cleveland's Major League Baseball team has changed its name to the Guardians, ridding itself of a previous name that many found highly offensive.

The team announced the name change Friday morning on Twitter, posting a two-minute video narrated by actor Tom Hanks.

Jamin Crow waited silently for the bull moose to turn and face him. In the cold, the teen stood in an open meadow, his gun resting on a branch. He waited and waited and waited.

Then the moose turned, and his brother started to yell, "Shoot!" If Crow didn't shoot, his brother would. So Crow took a deep breath and pulled the trigger.

"Your ears are ringing after the gunshot. And I look at my brother and he's giving me the happiest look I've ever seen," he says. "Everything is perfect at that moment ...You know you succeeded in what your goal is."

Fireworks soared above Tokyo's new Olympic Stadium Friday as the delayed Summer Games finally held its opening ceremony — an event that culminates in lighting the Olympic cauldron.

Athletes marched in front of thousands of empty seats as only a sparse crowd was admitted due to COVID-19 restrictions. Those attending included first lady Jill Biden, who chatted with French President Emmanuel Macron.

When it comes to COVID-19 in Africa, there were mixed signals from Africa on Thursday.

The World Health Organization reports that after eight consecutive weeks of surging cases across the continent, there's finally been a reversal. The total number of confirmed new cases in Africa fell by 1.7% to nearly 282,000 in the past week. And it's worth noting that this represents only 8% of new cases worldwide.

It's 2021, but the policing of female athletes' bodies is a practice that continues to thrive.

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U.S. Capitol Police are facing intense criticism after officers were overrun by rioters in the deadly January 6 attack. The agency is now at one of its most challenging moments in its history, facing low officer morale, growing resignations and simply running out of money. Now, they have a new leader vowing to revamp the department. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Grisales talked to the new chief on his first day on the job.

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