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A U.S. citizen has been arrested in Moscow on suspicion of espionage, Russia's Federal Security Service announced Monday.

The domestic security agency named the detained individual as Paul Whelan. It said in a short statement that he was caught during a spying operation, without adding further details.

The security service said a criminal investigation is underway. If convicted of espionage, Whelan faces up to 20 years in prison.

Editor's note: This story was originally published in February and has been republished with updates.

Today, everyone respects Arunachalam Muruganantham, 52, a social entrepreneur who lives in the city of Coimbatore in South India. But there was a time, he says, when his neighbors were convinced he had lost his mind. Some even believed that he was a vampire.

"It all started because I wanted to create a good sanitary napkin for my wife," he laughs.

On a recent rainy day, farmer Allen Druffel stands outside a silo shuffling his feet in the gravel. This co-op bin is where he stores his dried garbanzo beans in the tiny town of Colton, Wash. The place should be busy; trucks should be loading and hauling this year's crop to markets and international ports. But midafternoon, there's just the rain.

Since farmers like Druffel brought in this year's crops, hardly any garbanzos — or chickpeas — have moved.

"Thirty to 40 percent of our total revenue is in the bin," Druffel says. "And we're not sure what we want to do with it."

Updated at 11:46 a.m. ET

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren essentially kicked off her 2020 presidential campaign on Monday, announcing an exploratory committee — a formal step toward seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2020 — along with outlining a pitch to voters.

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Next we report on the economic damage from a trade war. The people affected are American farmers who grow garbanzo beans, lentils and peas. Here's Anna King of Northwest News Network.

In the past few years, coconut oil has been called a superfood that can help you blast belly fat and raise your good cholesterol. The sweet and nutty trendsetter has been featured in many cookbooks as a substitute for olive or canola oil — and it can cost a bundle at the store.

A recent survey found that 72 percent of Americans say coconut oil is a "healthy food," but many nutrition experts aren't convinced.

The holiday season is all about cute. You've got those ads with adorable children and those movies about baby animals with big eyes.

But when people encounter too much cuteness, the result can be something scientists call "cute aggression."

Updated at 12:20 p.m. ET

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina and her ruling alliance have secured another term in power following Bangladesh's general election Sunday, during which the military was deployed and almost 20 people were killed. The results, announced Monday by the Bangladesh Election Commission, have been rejected by the main opposition party, which accuses Hasina's party of rigging the election, according to the Associated Press.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican retiring from 42 years in the Senate as a new generation is sworn in, leaves a long list of achievements in health care. Some were less controversial than others.

About a billion miles beyond Pluto, a spacecraft is closing in on an icy minor planet — a mysterious little place that's only about 20 miles across.

If all goes well, NASA will start the new year with the most far-off exploration of a world ever, flying past it about 2,200 miles from the surface while taking images with an onboard telescope and camera. The closest approach will be at 12:33 a.m. ET on Jan 1.

The federal judge in Texas who ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional earlier this month said that the law can remain in effect while under appeal.

U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor wrote in his ruling filed on Sunday that "many everyday Americans would otherwise face great uncertainty during the pendency of appeal."

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If you had to leave your home at a moment's notice, what would you take with you? NPR has been posing that question to listeners and gathering stories from those who have fled conflict. Today, we bring you one of those stories.

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Finally, today, we want to introduce you to Charley Crockett.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HERE AM I")

CHARLEY CROCKETT: (Singing) Here am I, all alone again. Here am I, all alone again.

Heavy rain, long lines and broken voting machines in the capital plagued voters in the Democratic Republic of Congo who were casting their ballots in the long-awaited presidential election on Sunday.

This story is part of our ongoing "Missed Connections" series, and it begins at Southridge High School in Beaverton, Ore.

Greg McKelvey says the day he crossed paths with police officer Andrew Halbert eight years ago left him deeply affected him. This month, McKelvey reflected on the incident in a Twitter thread went viral.

In 2010, Greg McKelvey was a junior at the school. He remembers: "When I was in high school the police officer that was stationed in my school oftentimes called me and a lot of my friends out of class in his office."

In 2018, Afghanistan bled. Violence claimed the lives of nearly 3,000 civilians between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30, the highest number in that same period since 2014. The death toll of Afghan security forces — which some estimates put at more than 9,000 this year, between 25 and 30 deaths a day — has been called "unsustainable" by the U.S. military.

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For the first time in 20 years, on January 1, a flood of books, movies and music enter the public domain. They're all from 1923 - among the trove, iconic tunes like "The Charleston."

(SOUNDBITE OF BOB WILSON AND HIS VARSITY RHYTHM BOYS' "CHARLESTON")

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For the first time in 20 years, on January 1, a flood of books, movies and music enter the public domain. They're all from 1923 - among the trove, iconic tunes like "The Charleston."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

For the first time in 20 years, on January 1, a flood of books, movies and music enter the public domain. They're all from 1923 - among the trove, iconic tunes like "The Charleston."

(SOUNDBITE OF BOB WILSON AND HIS VARSITY RHYTHM BOYS' "CHARLESTON")

Tucked in the corner of an old school gym, adults and children regularly line up in front of Dr. Bert Johansson. They are migrants, waiting for treatment at a pop-up clinic in El Paso, Texas.

The clinic doesn't look like much — it's no more than a circle of folding chairs around a table spread with medical supplies.

Yet, for migrants recently released from federal processing facilities, this clinic could mean the difference between life or death.

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For the first time in 20 years, on January 1, a flood of books, movies and music enter the public domain. They're all from 1923 - among the trove, iconic tunes like "The Charleston."

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