Local and State News

  • Officials seek information on death of endangered gray wolf

EAGAR, Ariz. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investigating what it says is a suspicious death of an endangered Mexican gray wolf near Eagar. The agency and others are offering a reward of up to $37,000 for information that leads to a conviction. Federal law enforcement officers removed the carcass from the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest on Feb. 19. They say a vehicle was seen stopped or driving slowly near the Saffel Canyon trailhead the night before.

  • LEGISLATURE LIQUOR LAWS

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The governor has signed a sweeping liquor reform law that will allow home delivery in New Mexico. The bipartisan law makes it easier for businesses to get a liquor license. To compensate existing license holders, it provides for a tax break. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham says she signed the reform in part to increase revenue opportunities for the hospitality industry, which has been hit hard by shutdowns during the pandemic.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NAVAJO NATION

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The Navajo Nation Gaming Enterprise is planning to reopen two of its casinos this week with reduced capacity. The casinos in northwestern New Mexico near Gallup and Farmington will open Friday after being closed for a year amid the coronavirus pandemic. The move comes as the tribe eases its restrictions on businesses and sees a downward swing in COVID-19 cases and deaths. The casinos will operate at 25% capacity with no food or drink services and allow only residents of the reservation.

  • POLICING REFORMS-NEW MEXICO

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A bill that would end police immunity from prosecution in New Mexico to allow civil right lawsuits in state court cleared its last major hurdle with Senate approval, as Democratic legislators responded to concerns about police brutality and accountability. The state Senate on Wednesday endorsed the bill 26-15. The proposal would apply to violations of state civil rights guarantees ranging from racial discrimination to illegal search and seizure and freedom of speech violations.

New Mexico hires Pitino, as Minnesota aims higher once again

Mar 17, 2021

  Richard Pitino has been hired as New Mexico's coach, hours after Minnesota finalized his firing following eight seasons. Lobos athletic director Eddie Nuñez picked the 38-year-old Pitino to succeed Paul Weir, who went 58-63 in four seasons. New Mexico last reached the NCAA Tournament in 2014, in coach Craig Neal's first year. Pitino took the Gophers to the NCAA Tournament twice and finished higher than 10th place only three times in his eight seasons. Athletic director Mark Coyle says he didn't come to Minnesota to oversee a .500 program. 

Today in History

Mar 17, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Wednesday, March 17, the 76th day of 2021. There are 289 days left in the year. This is St. Patrick's Day. 

  • Today's Highlight in History: 

On March 17, 1762, New York held its first St. Patrick's Day parade. 

  • New Mexico awards $500K grant to Bueno Foods family business

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Bueno Foods has been awarded a $500,000 state grant to expand its 70-year-old family business and help boost sales of New Mexico products nationwide. Economic Development Department Cabinet Secretary Alicia J. Keyes announced Tuesday that Bueno Foods' economic assistance will be used to expand storage and manufacturing capacity and better distribute New Mexico chiles and food products throughout the U.S. The expansion will be on Bueno Foods property in Albuquerque.

  • LEGISLATURE-NEW MEXICO

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A budget bill is advancing toward a Senate vote in New Mexico that would boost public salaries, shore up spending on public education and provide at least $400 million in state spending on economic relief measures in response to the coronavirus pandemic. The Senate finance committee voted 6-4 with majority Democrats in support and Republicans in opposition to endorse amendments to a House-approved budget plan for the coming fiscal year.

  • EDUCATION FUNDING-NEW MEXICO

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico legislature is advancing a constitutional amendment to increase funding programs for children for decades to come. The state Senate is considering an additional 1.25% withdrawal from an educational endowment that has nearly doubled in the last decade to $20 billion. The Finance Committee is voting along party lines to advance the bill. Republicans say it will deplete the fund too quickly. Democrats united behind it after including K-12 funding.

  • CAPITOL BREACH-COWBOYS FOR TRUMP

ALAMOGORDO, N.M. (AP) — Cowboys for Trump founder Couy Griffin has said he will not resign his seat on the Otero County Commission as he awaits trial in connection with the Jan. 6 siege on the U.S. Capitol. The Alamogordo Daily News reported that Griffin made the declaration in response to a press release last week from county commissioners Gerald Matherly and Vickie Marquardt calling for Griffin's resignation. The topic took up more than an hour of the commission's meeting last Thursday after it was placed on the agenda for discussion.

The Albuquerque Public Schools board has named Scott Elder as superintendent of New Mexico's largest school district, a post he has held on an interim basis since last summer.

  • CONGRESS-HAALAND'S SUCCESSOR

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Rep. Deb Haaland's departure from Congress to serve as Secretary of the Interior will trigger a special election to choose a successor, starting with an rarely invoked nomination process that relies on party insiders. Haaland's resignation from Congress is likely to be formalized Tuesday and sets in motion a June general election for her 1st Congressional District seat. Major party nominees will be chosen by central committee members.

Today in History

Mar 16, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Tuesday, March 16, the 75th day of 2021. There are 290 days left in the year. 

  • Today's Highlights in History: 

On March 16, 1945, during World War II, American forces declared they had secured Iwo Jima, although pockets of Japanese resistance remained. 

  • 'Monumental day': Indian Country reacts to Deb Haaland vote

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Citizens of tribes across the U.S. are cheering Deb Haaland's confirmation as the first Native American secretary of a Cabinet agency. The U.S. Senate on Monday voted 51-40 in favor of the Democrat's nomination to lead the Interior Department. Many Native Americans have called Haaland's historic confirmation an answer to their prayers and a long time coming. They say the move positions someone they trust and admire to carry forward their hopes and expectations.

  • NEW MEXICO-DAMAGES CAP

New Mexico's highest court has ruled that monetary limits on some types of damages due to medical malpractice are not unconstitutional. The New Mexico Supreme Court on Monday unanimously upheld the Medical Malpractice Act, which maintains non-medical and non-punitive damages at $600,000. The limit does not extend to punitive damages and compensation for medical and rehabilitative care. The five-member panel argue that a cap will just be a legal consequence when juries determine amounts to award.

Scott Elder Named APS Superintendent

Mar 15, 2021

  

After leading the district as interim superintendent through months of a global pandemic, Elder was promoted to the permanent position by the Albuquerque Public Schools Board of Education on Monday.

Longtime Albuquerque Public Schools educator Scott Elder, who has served as interim superintendent for the past nine months, was selected for the job on a permanent basis by the APS Board of Education Monday.

  • CAPITOL BREACH-LEGISLATURES

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Troops, extra police details and fences cordoning off the New Mexico state Capitol grounds and adjacent streets from public access have cost taxpayers at least $700,000 in police overtime, salaries for National Guard troops, equipment rental and other special expenses. State officials provided the accounting for security spending in response to inquiries by The Associated Press. The unprecedented security measures were instituted by Democratic majority legislative leaders in the aftermath of the storming of the U.S.

  • Costs to fortify New Mexico Statehouse: $700,000 and growing

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Heavy security and fencing that have cordoned off the New Mexico state Capitol and adjacent streets from public access have cost taxpayers at least $700,000 in police overtime, salaries for National Guard troops, equipment rental and other special expenses. The unprecedented security measures were instituted by legislative leaders in the Democratic majority in the aftermath of the storming of the U.S. Capitol amid warnings by the FBI about threats to legislatures.

Costs to fortify New Mexico Statehouse: $700,000 and growing

Mar 15, 2021

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Heavy security and fencing that have cordoned off the New Mexico state Capitol and adjacent streets from public access have cost taxpayers at least $700,000 in police overtime, salaries for National Guard troops, equipment rental and other special expenses. The unprecedented security measures were instituted by legislative leaders in the Democratic majority in the aftermath of the storming of the U.S. Capitol amid warnings by the FBI about threats to legislatures. Republican state Sen.

Today in History

Mar 15, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Monday, March 15, the 74th day of 2021. There are 291 days left in the year. 

  • Today's Highlight in History: 

On March 15, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson, addressing a joint session of Congress, called for new legislation to guarantee every American's right to vote. The result was passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. 

  • New Mexico reports 160 more COVID-19 cases and 2 more deaths

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Health officials in New Mexico on Sunday reported 160 additional confirmed COVID-19 cases and two more deaths. The latest numbers increasing the state's totals to 188,311 cases and 3,852 known deaths since the pandemic started.

  • New Mexico reports 160 more COVID-19 cases and 2 more deaths

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Health officials in New Mexico on Sunday reported 160 additional confirmed COVID-19 cases and two more deaths. The latest numbers increasing the state's totals to 188,311 cases and 3,852 known deaths since the pandemic started.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NEW MEXICO

New Mexico reports 160 more COVID-19 cases and 2 more deathsSANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Health officials in New Mexico on Sunday reported 160 additional confirmed COVID-19 cases and two more deaths. The latest numbers increasing the state's totals to 188,311 cases and 3,852 known deaths since the pandemic started. Of the additional cases, 45 were reported in Bernalillo County and 29 in Dona Ana County.

Today in History

Mar 14, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Sunday, March 14, the 73rd day of 2021. There are 292 days left in the year. 

  • Today's Highlight in History: 

On March 14, 1964, a jury in Dallas found Jack Ruby guilty of murdering Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, and sentenced him to death. (Both the conviction and death sentence were overturned, but Ruby died before he could be retried.) 

  • 1 complaint on New Mexico House speaker still being reviewed

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The State Ethics Commission said in a letter that two of three complaints filed by a retired judge against New Mexico state House Speaker Brian Egolf likely will be dismissed. The letter on Friday signed by Executive Director Jeremy Farris said the third charge — that Egolf failed to communicate a potential conflict of interest — is still under investigation.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — With the slowing of the coronavirus outbreak, Albuquerque Public Schools will resume in-person learning for five days a week on April 5 though students can continue remote learning for the rest of the school year. New Mexico's largest school district announced its startup date Friday after the state Public Education Department earlier in the week said all schools were expected to reopen classrooms after spring break. The district's Board of Education was briefed on the reopening plan but did not vote on it.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NAVAJO NATION

TEESTO, Ariz. (AP) — A strong sense of community and taking care of one another has come to the aid of people like Raymond Clark on the Navajo Nation. The 71-year-old painter lives alone, without running water or transportation in the community of Teesto. He's content paying for wood deliveries, chipping in for gas money for a ride to town and carrying jugs to fill up at a water station. But sometimes, those things come to him.

New Mexico House endorses ban of demonstrations at homes

Mar 13, 2021

  SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A proposal to make it illegal to demonstrate at any specific private residence in New Mexico has been endorsed by the state House by a narrow margin. The House voted 33-31 on Thursday to outlaw "residential targeted picketing" to protect people from harassment or being terrorized in their homes by demonstrators. The measure moves to the Senate for consideration. Earlier this week, the Idaho House of Representatives voted down similar legislation.

Today in History

Mar 13, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Saturday, March 13, the 72nd day of 2021. There are 293 days left in the year. 

Today's Highlight in History: 

On March 13, 1933, banks in the U.S. began to reopen after a "holiday" declared by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

  • Wild population of endangered Mexican wolves keeps growing

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Once on the verge of extinction, the rarest subspecies of the gray wolf in North America has seen its population nearly double over the last five years. U.S. wildlife managers said Friday the latest survey shows there are now at least 186 Mexican gray wolves in the wild in New Mexico and Arizona. That marks the fifth straight year that the endangered species has increased its numbers.

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