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Morning Edition takes listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries every weekday.  For over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with up-to-the-minute news, background analysis and commentary. Regularly heard on Morning Edition are familiar voices, including commentator Cokie Roberts, as well as the special series StoryCorps, the largest oral history project in American history.  Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors -- including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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President Biden said on Tuesday that a key milestone in the fight against COVID-19 could be reached two months faster than earlier projected. By the end of May, there should be enough vaccine doses for every adult in America, he said — a dramatic improvement to his initial timetable for late July.

A turning point in speeding up that pledge came a few weeks ago, on a Sunday afternoon in early February, during a phone call with Johnson & Johnson executives that had been planned for 15 minutes but stretched for longer than an hour, two senior administration officials told NPR.

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Dolly Parton wants people to get vaccinated. To that end, she re-imagined one of her greatest hits. Parton sang an adaptation of "Jolene" in a social media post before getting the Moderna shot.

A 73-year-old widow from New Hampshire got stranded in New Zealand when the pandemic hit last year. Where she's living now is handling COVID-19 very differently than the United States.

The lies about voting machine company Dominion are having real world impact. One Ohio county stalled a contract to buy voting machines after hearing from constituents riled up by the false claims.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

Christopher Wray, the director of the FBI, is testifying before Congress about the January 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. He's taking questions from a committee chaired by Democrat Dick Durbin.

(SOUNDBITE OF HEARING)

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NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Trita Parsi of the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft about the next steps the U.S. should take to get Iran back to the negotiating table.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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While conspiracy theories aren't new, experts say their reach is spreading — accelerated by social media, encouraged by former President Donald Trump and weaponized in a way that is unprecedented.

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NOEL KING, HOST:

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How Rhode Island Is Handling Vaccine Rollout

Feb 26, 2021

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We've heard a lot about how hard it's been for restaurants to stay open during the pandemic. But what we often don't hear is that closing can be just as tough.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Our next guest has some issues with the Biden administration relief package. Congresswoman Nancy Mace is a freshman Republican from South Carolina. And she's on the line with us. Congresswoman, thanks so much for being here.

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When you think of the history of Black education in the United States, you might think of Brown vs. Board of Education and the fight to integrate public schools. But there's a parallel history too, of Black people pooling their resources to educate and empower themselves independently.

Enslaved people learned to read and write whenever and wherever they could, often in secret and against the law. "In accomplishing
this, I was compelled
 to resort to
various
 stratagems," like convincing white children to help him, wrote Frederick Douglass. "I had
no regular 
teacher."

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