Associated Press

  SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico state Capitol building has reopened to the public as the COVID-19 pandemic eases. It was closed to the general public for four consecutive legislative sessions. About 50 visitors wandered the corridors of the circular Statehouse on Wednesday as the doors were unlocked to all visitors for the first time in roughly a year. They were asked to wear masks and most if not all abided. Legislators shifted last spring to mostly virtual committee hearings as the pandemic took hold.

  • US pushes ahead with nuclear plans despite watchdog concerns

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The federal agency that oversees U.S. nuclear research and bomb-making has signed off on the design and cost range for investments needed for a project to manufacture key components for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The plan calls for making at least 30 plutonium cores per year at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. The National Nuclear Security Administration says design and construction could cost upwards of $4 billion initially.

  • US pushes ahead with nuclear plans despite watchdog concerns

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The federal agency that oversees U.S. nuclear research and bomb-making has signed off on the design and cost range for investments needed for a project to manufacture key components for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The plan calls for making at least 30 plutonium cores per year at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. The National Nuclear Security Administration says design and construction could cost upwards of $4 billion initially.

  • POPULATION STAGNANT-NEW MEXICO

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A new assessment of demographic trends in New Mexico says a population decline is imminent, with consequences for public spending and services. The report Thursday from the Legislature's budget and accountability office adds to indications in the 2020 Census of a population slowdown and suggests that schools and universities may want to plan accordingly.

  • PANDEMIC SCHOOL SPENDING

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico education officials are beginning to spend $1.5 billion in federal pandemic relief set aside for school districts and the Public Education Department. The Legislative Finance Committee said in a release Thursday that school districts have spent around 4% of the funds so far. They've got plenty of time to budget the three rounds of relief money, which have deadlines between the fall of 2022 and 2024.

  • US pushes ahead with nuclear plans despite watchdog concerns

Associated Press (AP) — The federal agency that oversees U.S. nuclear research and bomb-making has signed off on the first planning and design phase for a multibillion-dollar project to manufacture key components for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The plan calls for making at least 30 plutonium cores per year at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. The National Nuclear Security Administration says design and construction could cost upwards of $4 billion initially.

  • US pushes ahead with nuclear plans despite watchdog concerns

Associated Press (AP) — The federal agency that oversees U.S. nuclear research and bomb-making has signed off on the first planning and design phase for a multibillion-dollar project to manufacture key components for the nation's nuclear arsenal. The plan calls for making at least 30 plutonium cores per year at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. The National Nuclear Security Administration says design and construction could cost upwards of $4 billion initially.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NEW MEXICO

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham says she expects the state to reopen completely by the end of June, when 60% of residents are predicted to be fully vaccinated. She made the announcement Wednesday, proclaiming that the state was conquering COVID. New Mexico has been racing to get more people vaccinated. The latest state data shows more than 41% of residents 16 and older are fully vaccinated. But some people still don't want to be vaccinated.

CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico has announced plans to replace diesel vehicles and equipment with electrical and battery-operated components as part of a larger effort to improve airflow in the underground nuclear waste repository. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the only repository for nuclear waste disposal in the U.S. Carlsbad Nuclear Task Force Chair John Heaton said the group is working on multiple projects to enhance workforce safety, including converting all vehicles to electric.

  • CHILD WELFARE-TRANSPARENCY

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas says he's concerned about government employees potentially deleting public information without going through a legal process. He confirmed Wednesday that he's reviewing claims that the state's child welfare agency has been encrypting and routinely deleting its communications. The practice was first reported by Searchlight New Mexico, a nonprofit investigative journalism group. Republican lawmakers have asked for an investigation over transparency concerns.

  • High court justice, who authored end to execution, to retire

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State Supreme Court Justice Barbara Vigil is retiring from the New Mexico Supreme Court at the end of June after more than eight years at the high court. Vigil's departure from the bench was announced Tuesday and triggers a vetting process for her successor by a bipartisan nominating commission. Her successor stands for partisan election in 2022.

  • High court justice, who authored end to execution, to retire

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State Supreme Court Justice Barbara Vigil is retiring from the New Mexico Supreme Court at the end of June after more than eight years at the high court. Vigil's departure from the bench was announced Tuesday and triggers a vetting process for her successor by a bipartisan nominating commission. Her successor stands for partisan election in 2022.

  • INTERNET BLIMP STUDY

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico is investing in a study to see if blimps can deliver high-speed internet to rural areas. Officials confirm that a $3.2 million contract is in the works with Switzerland-based airship company Sceye (SKY'). It would launch airships rigged with internet devices from a hanger in Roswell and pilot them remotely. The New Mexico Economic Development Department says it's financing the study to find cheaper and faster ways to expand the state's weak broadband infrastructure laid bare by the pandemic.

  • NEW MEXICO WILDFIRE

OTERO, N.M. (AP) — A top-tier management team and additional tankers and ground crews have been assigned to a wildfire burning in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico. The fire near the Three Rivers Campground and west of the Ski Apache ski resort had burned 6,100 acres with no containment around its perimeter as of Tuesday morning. That's according to a statement posted by fire officials. It said the fire was reported Monday and its cause was under investigation. No injuries or structure damage has been reported.

  • New Mexico assigned nearly $19 billion in federal aid so far

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A new estimate shows that successive rounds of federal economic relief since the outset of the  coronavirus pandemic will deliver an estimated $18.9 billion in money and services to New Mexico. The Legislature's budget and accountability office published the estimate on Monday. A broader analysis will be presented to lawmakers later this week. The aid to one of the nation's poorest states dwarfs New Mexico's annual general fund spending of $7.4 billion.

  SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A new estimate shows that successive rounds of federal economic relief since the outset of the  coronavirus pandemic will deliver an estimated $18.9 billion in money and services to New Mexico. The Legislature's budget and accountability office published the estimate on Monday. A broader analysis will be presented to lawmakers later this week. The aid to one of the nation's poorest states dwarfs New Mexico's annual general fund spending of $7.4 billion.

Today in History

Apr 27, 2021

  • Today in History 

Today is Tuesday, April 27, the 117th day of 2021. There are 248 days left in the year. 

  • Today's Highlight in History: 

On April 27, 1978, 51 construction workers plunged to their deaths when a scaffold inside a cooling tower at the Pleasants Power Station site in West Virginia fell 168 feet to the ground. 

  • New Mexico assigned nearly $19 billion in federal aid so far

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A new estimate shows that successive rounds of federal economic relief since the outset of the  coronavirus pandemic will deliver an estimated $18.9 billion in money and services to New Mexico. The Legislature's budget and accountability office published the estimate on Monday. A broader analysis will be presented to lawmakers later this week. The aid to one of the nation's poorest states dwarfs New Mexico's annual general fund spending of $7.4 billion.

  • 2020 CENSUS-NEW MEXICO

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The 2020 Census results show New Mexico's population grew by 2.8% over the last decade. It had the second slowest growth rate in the West, outpacing only Wyoming. Officials with the Census Bureau said Monday that overall, the national growth rate of 7.4% between 2010 and 2020 marked the second slowest in U.S. history. In New Mexico, the results put the resident population at just over 2.1 million, or 58,343 more people than a decade ago.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Weather forecasters and forest managers are warning that warm, windy and dry conditions are combining to boost fire danger around New Mexico. The National Weather Service in Albuquerque says critical fire weather is expected to shift Tuesday to the eastern part of the state, while much of central and southern New Mexico would see unsettled weather by Wednesday and Thursday. Fire restrictions will take effect Tuesday on the Gila National Forest, where Forest Supervisor Adam Mendonca said there has been an increase in abandoned campfires.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK-NAVAJO NATION

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. (AP) — The Navajo Nation is reporting 26 new confirmed COVID-19 cases and 10 additional deaths. Tribal health officials released figures combining new cases found over the weekend. This brings the total number of virus-related deaths on the vast reservation that covers parts of Arizona, New Mexico and Utah to 1,273. More than 30,000 cases have been documented.

  • Bernalillo County authorities arrest man in a fatal shooting

ALBUQUERQUE N.M. (AP) — Authorities say have arrested a man in connection with a fatal shooting in Albuquerque. Bernalillo County Sheriff's officials say 22-year-old Ruben Sanchez has been booked into jail on suspicion of aggravated battery with great bodily harm. It was unclear Sunday if Sanchez has a lawyer yet. Sheriff's deputies say they received reports of an unidentified man driving in the area when another driver fired several shots at him Friday evening.

  • Bernalillo County authorities arrest man in a fatal shooting

ALBUQUERQUE N.M. (AP) — Authorities say have arrested a man in connection with a fatal shooting in Albuquerque. Bernalillo County Sheriff's officials say 22-year-old Ruben Sanchez has been booked into jail on suspicion of aggravated battery with great bodily harm. It was unclear Sunday if Sanchez has a lawyer yet. Sheriff's deputies say they received reports of an unidentified man driving in the area when another driver fired several shots at him Friday evening.

  • Report: Slain officer wasn't part of plan to stop suspect

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal officials reportedly arranged with New Mexico State Police to make a traffic stop of a drug trafficker. But an officer not briefed on the plan was fatally shot when he pulled over the man instead of others who were waiting to make the stop. The Albuquerque Journal reports that State Police records into the killing of Officer Darian Jarrott indicated that the officer knew of a "be on the lookout notice" for the trafficker, Omar Cueva.

  • ALBUQUERQUE ZOO-GORILLAS

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Officials at Albuquerque's city zoo say they've said goodbye to one gorilla and welcomed another. Albuquerque BioPark officials said 35-year-old Marcus left in March to go another accredited zoo and that 19-year-old Kojo arrived this month from the Smithsonian National Zoo. Officials said the zoo which accepted Marcus will announce his arrival once he's ready to be moved into a public habitat after a quarantine safety period.

  • ALBUQUERQUE ZOO-GORILLAS

One gorilla departs Albuquerque zoo, another arrives

  • JILL BIDEN-SOUTHWEST

ST. MICHAELS, Ariz. (AP) — Students on the largest Native American reservation spoke to first lady Jill Biden on Friday about challenges they've faced during the coronavirus pandemic, including poor internet access and feelings of isolation. The hourlong discussion took place at Hunters Point Boarding School, a small, aging grade school on the Navajo Nation. The handful of students were from schools in the surrounding area. Lesley Tohtsoni teaches U.S. history at Navajo Preparatory School in Farmington, New Mexico.

  • VIRUS OUTBREAK

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — At least half of New Mexico's K-12 students are choosing to attend school in person as of last week. State education officials say that the vast majority of schools are offering in-person schooling, with the exception of schools under tribal health restrictions. Education Secretary Stewart said Thursday that only 17 out of the state's 800-odd schools have had to close because of virus concerns since widespread reopening began on April 5.

  • Jill Biden to visit tribal school still teaching remotely

ST. MICHAELS, Ariz. (AP) — Jill Biden is set to visit a small grade school on the outskirts of the Navajo Nation capital Friday. Staff at Hunters Point Boarding School in St. Michaels have repainted the buliding, upgraded the washer and dryer in the dorms, placed plexiglass between beds and installed hand-washing stations. School officials are hopeful they can welcome students back to the classroom this fall.

  • Jill Biden to visit tribal school still teaching remotely

ST. MICHAELS, Ariz. (AP) — Jill Biden is set to visit a small grade school on the outskirts of the Navajo Nation capital Friday. Staff at Hunters Point Boarding School in St. Michaels have repainted the buliding, upgraded the washer and dryer in the dorms, placed plexiglass between beds and installed hand-washing stations. School officials are hopeful they can welcome students back to the classroom this fall.

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