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You know the feeling: You're driving and you spot a little-known memorial that makes you want to pull over and find out more. It could be a monument to some local hero or to a long-forgotten historical moment. NPR is taking a summer-long road trip and exploring the deep — and sometimes mysterious — histories of these spots. Click on the icons below to explore the series.

Jonathan Kaplan describes himself as a "serial entrepreneur." He started his first businesses when he was a kid, with a paper route, snow shoveling, then landscaping. He's had a printing company, and a DJ service, playing Sweet 16 parties and bar mitzvahs — all before Kaplan hit college.

He's picked up speed since then, founding several technology companies, including the one that created the Flip digital camera. He sold that to Cisco for more than $500 million. The company later discontinued the camera.

The military's four-legged warriors now have a more hopeful future in store.

Military working dogs were once euthanized when their service days were over.

But, their fate is changing as military and civilian families pressure the Defense Department to make it easier for handlers to adopt their canine colleagues.

Looking out over Camp Pendleton's K-9 training field in California, Marine Cpl. Daniel Cornier shares stories about Chaak, the dog he deployed with to Afghanistan.

His words are halting and emotional.

When Rosanne Cash was 18, her father (you may have heard of him; some call him the Man in Black) presented her with a gift: a list of 100 essential country songs, chosen to help the budding singer-songwriter connect with and better understand the music that came before her.

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