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New Mexico News

Latest New Mexico news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. MST

Latest New Mexico news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. MST

Latest New Mexico news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. MST

SANTA FE POLICE OFFICER KILLED

Woman arrested in crash that killed 2, including officer

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico woman has been arrested after authorities say she caused a crash that killed an officer and retired firefighter and then she lied about having been kidnapped. Authorities say Saturday that 46-year-old Jeannine Jaramillo faces charges including first-degree murder. She had told authorities she was carjacked at knifepoint. Authorities say evidence from the vehicle shows there was only one person inside at the time of the Wednesday crash and that DNA from an airbag belonged to Jaramillo. The collision killed a Santa Fe police officer and a retired firefighter. Jaramillo told KOB-TV that she was abducted and feared for her life. Authorities say she had given a similar account in the past.

DONATED CADAVER SHORTAGE

New Mexico University suffers shortage of donated cadavers

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Fewer people in New Mexico are donating their bodies to science when they die, making it harder to train medical students preparing for their careers. The University of New Mexico Anatomy Lab said Friday that it needs about 75 donated cadavers each year to train future doctors, but it currently only has 18. Amy Rosenbaum, director of the university's anatomical donations program, says medical students missed out during the early part of the coronavirus pandemic when all teaching was virtual. The pandemic also has affected donations with mortuaries overwhelmed handling deaths and staffing problems, along with transportation issues, she said.

RUSSIA-NEW MEXICO INVESTMENTS

New Mexico governor wants to divest from Russian stocks

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham is looking to join other U.S. governors and lawmakers in numerous states who are seeking to add to the financial squeeze on Russia over its war against Ukraine. The Democrat announced Friday that she is urging the directors of the state's permanent funds and two major pension funds for public employees to examine investments that may benefit Russia and its supporters and take steps to divest. The Russian markets have been closed for several days, halting trading on the securities in question. The State Investment Council will likely have to discuss the governor's request as a matter of policy.

EDUCATION FREE COLLEGE SIGNED

Governor signs free college bill, expands coverage

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham is signing legislation that will make college even cheaper for more state residents. The New Mexico Opportunity Scholarship Act will cover the cost of tuition and fees. Unlike the existing Lottery Scholarship, it can be used by state residents who haven't been to school for a while or need to pursue a degree or certificate part-time. Lujan Grisham is signing the bill at Western New Mexico University in Silver City. Funding for the measure comes from record-high state revenues, as well as one-time federal pandemic relief money. The new scholarship doesn't have a permanent funding source.

NEW MEXICO ENERGY FUTURE

New Mexico regulators refute attorney general's claims

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico utility regulators are refuting allegations by Attorney General Hector Balderas that they aren't pursuing the public interest. In a letter to Balderas, the Public Regulation Commission emphasized the need for teamwork but also corrected what it contends are inaccurate notions by the attorney general's office. Relations between Balderas and the commission have been strained over a rejected merger involving the state's largest electric provider and concerns about possible summer blackouts. Regulators recently cleared the way for Public Service Co. of New Mexico to extend operations of a unit at the coal-fired San Juan power plant in hopes of meeting peak summer demands.

ELECTION 2022-DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY-NEW MEXICO

New Mexico Democrats pick top contenders for June 7 primary

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Democrats are deciding which candidates to put at the top of their primary election ballot as the party strives to retain control of every statewide office and challenge a Republican incumbent in Congress. Convention-related events began Friday in Roswell and extend into the weekend, when party delegates begin balloting to endorse their favorite contenders. Competitive Democratic primary contests include races for state treasurer, state auditor and Congress in the 2nd District. Unopposed Democrats seeking reelection include Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver and State Lands Commissioner Stephanie Garcia Richard.

HEALTH CARE-NEW MEXICO

New Mexico hospitals seek new financial support

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Hospital executives are urging New Mexico's governor to sign off on health care spending proposals that would devote $171 million to shoring up labor costs at hospitals and nursing homes. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has until March 9 to vet a $8.5 billion spending plan from the Democratic-led Legislature for the fiscal year starting on July 1. In a public letter to the governor on Thursday, the New Mexico Hospital Association describes financial and physical strain of the pandemic on hospital staff that has left nursing staffs depleted. The governor also is weighing endorsement of a $1,000 personal income tax credit for resident nurses.

AP-US-MISSING-MINORITIES

Members of Congress highlight missing minority women, girls

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Members of a congressional panel focused on civil rights and liberties are acknowledging that more needs to be done to address the disproportionate numbers of Indigenous, Black and other minority women and girls who are missing in the United States. The panel's chairman, U.S. Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, called it a "crisis hiding in plain sight." He says he hopes Thursday's hearing will shine more light on the problem. The panel heard from advocates working to bring more attention to the cases of missing and slain Native Americans as well as a Black father from Baltimore whose pregnant daughter went missing in 2017.