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The Latest: Torres Small wins Democratic US House primary

Jun 5, 2018

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The Latest on New Mexico primary elections (all times local):8:30 p.m.Las Cruces attorney Xochitl Torres Small has won the Democratic nomination for New Mexico's 2nd Congressional District as the party looks to take control of a seat along the U.S.-Mexico border that's eluded it for years.Torres Small on Tuesday defeated U.S. Coast Guard veteran Madeline "Mad" Hildebrandt. She'll face the winner of a three-way contest for the Republican nomination in November's general election.The granddaughter of Mexican immigrants and wife of a state lawmaker, Torres Small has rarely mentioned President Donald Trump's name on the campaign trail. She tells voters she's a gun owner who postponed her honeymoon to go hunting.The congressional race is one of many expected to draw national attention because it may help determine which party controls the U.S. House of Representatives.___8:15 p.m.U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham has won the Democratic nomination for New Mexico governor and will take on Republican Congressman Steve Pearce in November for the state's top job.The three-term congresswoman defeated state Sen. Joseph Cervantes and former media executive Jeff Apodaca in a campaign focused on improving the state's lagging economy and public education.Lujan Grisham leads the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and has been a vocal critic of President Donald Trump and his immigration policies.She previously led state public health agencies under three former governors, including Democrat Bill Richardson. Her campaign received endorsements from an array of labor unions, progressive advocacy groups and several tribal governments.State law prevents Republican Gov. Susana Martinez from seeking a consecutive third term.___7 p.m.Polls are closing in New Mexico as voters decide on a Democratic candidate for governor and major-party nominees for two open congressional seats.More than 92,000 votes were cast on Tuesday as the race narrows to succeed Republican Gov. Susana Martinez, who cannot run for a consecutive third term.Democratic U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is competing against state Sen. Joseph Cervantes and former media executive Jeff Apodaca, the son of a former governor.The winner will face the sole Republican candidate, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, in the November general election.___6 p.m.New Mexico election officials say primary Election Day voting has surpassed 92,000 people.The New Mexico Secretary of State's Office says the figures reflect a partial tally of votes as of 4 p.m. on Tuesday. Democrats accounted for nearly two-thirds of Election Day participants.In addition, more than 110,000 ballots from early and absentee voters were cast before Saturday.Candidates are competing in wide-open primary races for New Mexico governor and two congressional seats, and several additional statewide races.___4:40 p.m.The New Mexico Secretary of State's Office says more than 57,000 people have cast ballots in the first six hours of voting Tuesday.Spokesman Joey Keefe says the figure reflects voter numbers through 1 p.m. They represent an incomplete breakdown of Election Day voter turnout because not all counties use systems for analyzing numbers throughout the day.Two-thirds of the voters in the early Election Day count were Democrats.Tuesday's numbers come in addition to the more than 110,000 ballots from early and absentee voters who cast their ballots before Saturday.About 202,000 people in all voted in New Mexico's last mid-term primary elections in 2014.New Mexico voters are choosing from three Democratic candidates for governor. Two congressional seats are wide open.Polls close at 7 p.m.___4 p.m.The New Mexico Secretary of State's Office has received calls from voters asking about their registration status and voting locations, but a spokesman says it hasn't received reports of major issues at the polling sites Tuesday.Voting is underway for wide-open primary races for governor and two congressional seats. Polling places are open until 7 p.m. Tuesday.Officials say early voter turnout ahead of Tuesday was higher than New Mexico's 2014 mid-term primary election. Figures show more than 110,000 ballots were cast through Saturday during early voting.Democrats Michelle Lujan Grisham, Joseph Cervantes and Jeff Apodaca are seeking their party's nomination for governor. The winner will face the sole Republican candidate, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, in the November general election.Voters in the state's central and southern districts will decide which Democrats and Republicans will run for two seats in November.___7:30 a.m.Election-day voting is underway in New Mexico as voters select nominees in wide-open primary races for governor and two congressional seats.Polling places are open until 7 p.m. Tuesday. Absentee ballots are also due by 7 p.m.Democrats Michelle Lujan Grisham, Joseph Cervantes and Jeff Apodaca are seeking their party's nomination for governor. The winner will face the sole Republican candidate, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, in the November general election.Voters in the state's central and southern districts will decide which Democrats and Republicans will run for two seats that could determine which parties control the U.S. House of Representatives.___12:30 a.m.Candidates are pushing toward the finish line in wide-open primary races for New Mexico governor and two congressional seats.The three-way Democratic primary for governor devolved into attacks about private business dealings and trustworthiness in the days before Tuesday's election. The state's lagging economy, dissatisfaction with public education and concerns about urban crime took center stage in public forums and political advertising.Democratic U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham is competing against state Sen. Joseph Cervantes and former media executive Jeff Apodaca, the son of a former governor.The winner will face the sole Republican candidate, U.S. Rep. Steve Pearce, in the November general election.A Democratic governor likely would shut Republicans out of redistricting decisions in 2021 and consolidate Democrats' control over state government for a decade to come.